Monumentals

Death comes to all, but great achievements build a monument which shall endure until the sun grows cold.
— Ralph Waldo Emerson

Monumentals

Many questions surround the way that a society commemorates. From specific events to entire eras, communal accomplishments to individual figures, there are a plethora of interesting choices that go into each and every representation of our history. One form in particular that I try to present in this series is the physical monument or memorial. How do we use structures to communicate? Do those messages evolve over time or become reinterpreted in new ways? What is the role of the location, and does this context aid and/or challenge the viewer? Are the monuments themselves a kind of achievement, and if so, what tensions might arise between the memorial itself and the subject being commemorated? What does it say to choose a specific moment to represent a monument in a photograph; particularly if that moment itself involves change as in the case of a renovation?

It is interesting to see history unfold in the physical layers of the earth, the way a city like Rome is built anew upon itself for millennia, and yet each past iteration is preserved in a timeline of stone and dirt. This series explores something similar with regard to the process of image making. How can my image build on a tangible object that is itself built on a set of ideas about an actual event or person? And then there is always the element of chance. Since most of these types of monuments are outdoors, the ever-changing sky may become a factor, or the surrounding vegetation, or most critically the quality of the light. These elements can be used to craft a story or a certain perspective about the subject, but they are also generally beyond the control of the photographer and thus create another layer of context.

These images are available as inkjet prints on Hahnemuhle Fine Art paper. They come matted and ready to frame in standard sizes. Please visit the Print Shop for more details.